Whale watching

New Zealand is famed for its whale watching, the water is so clean here you don’t have to go too far from the coast to find the marine wildlife.
Kaikoura is the place to visit in the South Island, due to the way we’d planned our route and an earthquake destroying most of the roads, we weren’t able to visit there.
Auckland was our back up! 


I got to try out my full waterproof outfit! 




Eyes peeled keeping a watch for any activity.


And pretend we were Jack and Rose…








The dolphins found us and started dancing around the boat!


A Bryde’s whale was also sighted! 


This was one hell of a way to complete my time here in New Zealand! That’s right, I’m coming home! Not for too long, I already have three more adventures lined up! 

So stay tuned for the next escapade! 

Touching a Kiwi

We had stayed in the Bunkdown hostel in Whangarei, where they told us about the Native Bird Recovery Centre, where you can actually touch a kiwi bird.
We thought an experience like this would cost quite a bit, but it’s only a $10 minimum donation to help keep the centre running.


This is Sparky, he was caught in a trap and lost his leg, he would have died in the wild, but here he has a full life, munching on worms and helping educate the children of New Zealand.



This was definitely one of he best experiences in New Zealand. Being so inexpensive too was a bonus for the budget traveler. 
Robert, the founder of the centre is full of facts and information, and his passion for the birds and their care shows. 
He found us worms to feed Sparky.


The centre helps all kinds of birds, the website even has a webcam to watch eggs hatching that have have been abandoned and rescued by the centre. 


I have included the link to the website as this was literally the best experience, and it helps injured animals.
http://www.nbr.org.nz/sparky

Whangarei

Only a short walk to see Whangarei falls, then a stroll around the town basin.




The local school kids had painted all the teams that will be taking part during the British Lion Tour.



I’d read about Mermaid pools in Matapouri bay. Bit of a climb to get there, especially in flip flops!


So worth it.


Crystal clear, lagoon-like pools were our reward for our trek.





The beach itself was alright too…






Had some fun playing with the slow-mo video.





This was mine and Laura’s last weekend together before I move onto my next travels, so naturally we had to have a drink to celebrate.


Didn’t take too many beers before we were subjected to unwanted male attention..






Naturally, not much sight seeing or even moving was done the day after.

Eastside

 
As we made our way south from Doubtless bay we discovered a chocolate factory and gelateria in Kerikeri. After sampling some chocolate and ice cream, we realized it was the sister factory of the one we visited in Marlborough in the South Island.


We camped in Paihia and woke up to views over the water.



Paihia is the place where it all began…with Waitangi Treaty Grounds.
This place was amazing, experienced another cultural show, had a free guided tour around the grounds and the museum was really well laid out which made it easy to understand.







The museum offers a free guided tour around the treaty grounds, made the most of that.


Giant ceremonial canoe which we were told Lady Diana had a ride in even though women are not supposed to go in the war boats.


The stump of one of the three Kauri trees. Photo doesn’t really show how huge this tree was. Two of me could have laid across it, I wanted to try, but this is sacred ground and tomfoolery of that sort is disrespectful.


The flagstaff with the three flags associated with New Zealand, the Union Jack, the Maori flag and the flag we know and love today.
Onward south with a stop off to the Hunderwasser toilets. 



Northernmost point of NZ

We took the car ferry over the Hokianga harbour. 



After consulting a map we decided to head for the Mitimiti coast, this was a bit of a mistake as it was miles and miles of gravel road to find ourselves on a pretty bleak beach!



Onwards to the dunes. Now, everyone else sandboards down the dunes. I’ve already experienced hurtling head first down a sandy mountain in Namibia, so wasn’t in a huge rush to do it again. Instead, we did handstands and dug holes.





Finally, our goal for the day…Cape Reinga. The most Northern point of New Zealand.





As we had eaten the national dish (fish and chips) at Bluff in the southernmost point we had planned to do the same in the north. Cape Reinga is Maori sacred ground so no eating allowed. It was really peaceful there. 



We don’t go too many days without an ice cream round here…


The west coast of the northlands is also famous for 90 mile beach (which is actually 55 miles long) apparently is called 90 mile beach because when it was first discovered it was explored on horse back, the maths was that horses can travel about 30 miles in a day, it took them 3 days, therefore its 90 miles long. Like humans, horses are slower in sand, so that’s where the sum went wrong! 




90 mile beach was our last western northlands stop. Off to the east side now to Mangonui.



We had our little hearts set on fish and chips so, in the age old tradition we ate them in the car overlooking the harbour.

Northlands

Can’t believe we have nearly seen the whole of New Zealand! 
We finished off the Coromandel by hugging some Kauri trees. Some of these trees have been here for thousands of years so they are doing their best to conserve them.


Hugging them was my contribution to conservation.
Currently exploring the northlands, where there are a few sparsely populated villages.
Our first stop was Omamari, on the West coast. We stayed at a campsite overlooking the Kaiiwi lake.






After a pretty rough nights sleep in the back of the car (the temperature is starting to drop!) we head to another Kauri forest. We weren’t allowed to hug these trees.

These pictures can never show the sheer size of these giants.





From the Kauri forest we head up the coast to Maunganui Bluff. I took a walk on the beach and Laura explored the mountain. We both got soaked to the skin, I was wind and sand beaten, Laura covered in mud. The signs of a good walk! 



We dried off best we could in the car and continued north. 



We stopped in Opononi and found the only campsite available. This is where we learned there are very few towns. Luckily we had enough food to last until we found a store! 


At least there’s plenty of drinking water for us! 

Up the Coromandel

 
Driving further north until we reach a little village to stop in, attempted to stretch our legs on the beach at Whangamata and nearly tripped over an errant seal. (According to the ‘locals’ seals don’t usually stop here.)

It was quite a bleak day, and ashamed to say we were probably still hungover from Friday! 
A cwtchy little cafe served nachos and loaded wedges and milkshake. Sold! 


Worked off a nacho by pretending to surf.



Waikato is our next stop to dip our feet in the hot water springs. What you’re supposed to do is hire a spade to dig a hole and lay in the hot water that comes up through the sand. 
What we did was steal a hole someone else had made to bathe our feet in.



We were on a mission today and made it all the way to Whitianga, where we stayed for a couple of nights to relax.



As we were able to properly relax and renew here, I did start doodling again…


Hopefully more inspiration will come more often throughout my travels.