Baikal

Staying in the tiny village of Baikalsk with my host, we woke early-ish to catch a bus to the next town to catch a train to Port Baikal.

Enjoyed a breakfast of pelmany (dumplings) whilst gazing at the mountain view.

Lake Baikal is still iced over, but starting to melt (so no walking on ice for me).

Innokentiy took me to the supermarket to stock up on snacks, they stocked cans of horse meat!

Staying in the tiny village of Baikalsk with my host, we woke early-ish to catch a bus to the next town to catch a train to Port Baikal.

Enjoyed a breakfast of pelmany (dumplings) whilst gazing at the mountain view.

Lake Baikal is still iced over, but starting to melt (so no walking on ice for me).

Innokentiy took me to the supermarket to stock up on snacks, they stocked cans of horse meat!

Apparently this is the guy who came up with the idea of the Transiberian railroad.

Pretty amazing views from the train as it trundles alongside the lake’s edge.

When I did manage to peel my eyes away from the view and look out the other window I noticed tiny little settlements.

We arrived at Port Baikal where we would be staying the night.

Had a little explore, the temperature changes here were really weird, you’d be walking along quite comfortable, then all of a sudden you would hit a pocket of cold. Like walking through ghosts!

The water here is said to be drinkable straight from the lake. That may have been true at some point in time, but when you see the locals littering the shore and throwing fag butts into the clear waters…I wasn’t about to drink it!

It was so peaceful here, exactly how I imagined. I could have stayed standing here staring out at the water and mountains, listening to the ripples of the water and the cracking of the ice melting for a good hour.

Innokentiy wanted to show me around a bit.

This is where lake Baikal ends and the river begins, this bit never freezes, which is lucky as they closed the road from Port Baikal to Irkutsk. So you have to take a little boat over to the other side to take the bus!

Now, I would consider myself a fairly responsible traveler, as in, I do a bit of research about the country I’m going to to find out if I need certain vaccinations from any nasties. I did this research and it showed we don’t need anything.

I learned from my host that in Siberia there are ticks that may be infected with encephalitis. Which, if you look it up, is a bloody horrific thing to be infected with as it eats away at your brain cells. Scary. Obviously, I’m not vaccinated against this. And sure enough, a bloody tick landed on me! I freaked out a little bit. I like my brain. I like it functioning. I didn’t get bitten, but you don’t feel these buggers land on you OR bite you, so by the time you’ve found them with their heads buried under your skin, it’s too late.

Tried to enjoy the view of the sun setting over Baikal, whilst constantly checking my coat and trousers for ticks!

Finally made it back out of the grass and to our ‘hotel’ which is also the train station, as I discovered in the night when trains sit outside chugging the engine and tooting their whistles regardless of the fact it’s 3am.

I jumped into the shower as soon as we were checked in and examined myself for ticks. There were none! Thank goodness. My brain is safe, for now.

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Transiberian Travels

What do you do on a train for four days? Catch up with blog writing (and sleep).

So I’ve finally caught up, a bit late, but better than nothing!

From Russia with love and

Some like it hot are the only films I’ve seen and can think of that involve sleeper trains. So I’m going to blame them for my longing to travel on one. They both conjured up the sense of adventure and romance. Plus it’s an awesome, chilled out way to travel, as the Russians showed me. You can sit in the restaurant cart drinking vodka and eating fish and potatoes from 9am until midnight, or until you pass out, whichever comes first!

I preferred to nurse my green tea and gaze out the window, the train moves slow enough that you can actually appreciate the scenery without it becoming a blur.

This seemed like the perfect time to admire the surroundings, there was still plenty of snow everywhere, but a clear blue sky behind the birch trees.

Changing time zones as we travel through the country, falling asleep at 2200, waking at 1200, but realising I’d only actually slept about 6 hours! That spun me out!

I woke up one day to the sound of an Irish accent, I went to investigate and met Niall, who was also achieving his bucket list goals.

Through Niall I met two guys who were in the Russian army and also knew some English. All their food and snacks, they shared, they would help translate when I was struggling, and good fun to be around.

These guys definitely made the journey quicker.

Before I knew it, I was at Baikal.

The smallest station I’d seen. I was the only person getting off and the train completely passed the platform and I had to exit the train via a long drop into the darkness!

My Couchsurfing host, Innokentiy was there to meet me. It was past midnight and we made our way by taxi back to his apartment.

He showed me around and then opened a map and gave me two choices of tour he would take me on the next day.

First, try to sleep in a bed that isn’t rocking and no gentle ‘ta-chuck-ta-chuck’ of the train as it rumbles along the tracks.

Thank you

Victoria Morgan-Hill